Blog

Louisiana Properties offer Immediate Occupancy

Spread the love

EHDOC offers subsidized housing opportunities in Louisiana for low income seniors seeking long term residency. For seniors 62 and older who were displaced by Hurricane Laura or others seeking immediate occupancy, please call our Community Managers to inquire about these four properties:

 

Other Louisiana communities are listed below. 
Our Community Managers look forward to speaking to you.

Chateau Des Amis, Ville Platte, LA:                      Debbie Clark – 337.363.4301

Point Villa Apartments, Church Point, LA:           Tessa Guilbeaux – 337.581.5963

Leisure Lane Apartments, Rayne, LA:                  Tessa Guilbeaux – 337.581.5963

Pine Grove Apartments, Pineville, LA:                  Marilyn Jones – 318.640.3006

Oakwood Apartments, Cheneyville, LA:               Marilyn Jones – 318.279.2746

Sunshine Center Apartments, Leesville, LA:        Melissa Wingate – 337.239.0463

 

EHDOC logo large wheelchair symbol Equal housing logo

Available for Immediate Occupancy

Spread the love

 

Visit our  Immediate Occupancy page for a list of EHDOC affordable senior communities that currently have Immediate Occupancy apartments in Louisiana. Click here.

SENIOR LIVING SENIOR DIGNITY: Summer 2020

Spread the love

Harsh Impact of Coronavirus Exposes the Critical Shortage of Safe and Affordable Housing and Services for the Elderly

by Steve Protulis, EHDOC President and CEO

Steve Protulis, EHDOC President and CEO

These past few months have been particularly hard with the high rate of infections amongst seniors. COVID-19 has also crippled our economy, spiked homelessness, and exposed the critical shortage of safe and affordable housing. While Congress passed in March the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES), its funds are rapidly running out. As our Chairman Christopher Shelton urges in his accompanying article, we need to educate Congress to expand the supply of affordable senior housing. So, what is the Administration proposing in its FY2021 budget to develop affordable senior housing?

When the Administration released its proposed FY2021 budget in early February, I had very mixed feelings. While I was pleasantly surprised that the Administration had requested, for the first time in many years, a slight increase in funding for the construction of Section 202 Supportive Housing for the Elderly, I was also very disappointed and concerned that simultaneously the Administration was proposing very harsh cuts for other affordable housing, health care, and services for the elderly.

This is good news and a step in the right direction since it is the first time since FY2013 that any funds have been requested by the Administration for the Section 202 Capital Advance construction program that EHDOC and other non-profit organizations have long relied upon to develop affordable senior housing. However, despite the increase, it is also woefully inadequate compared to the $825 million that had been funded for Section 202 affordable senior housing in FY2010, including $582 million for new construction.

During recent years when zero funds were neither requested nor funded, the elderly population has significantly increased by several millions (AARP documents that 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 every day); as a result the costs for housing has skyrocketed; and the number of homeless has tragically increased throughout America (over a half million homeless people nightly).

It is difficult to understand and accept these funding cuts when the Administration clearly recognizes the critical shortage of affordable senior housing as documented in their Congressional justification statement that accompanied their FY2021 budget request. Key points cited in the Administration’s proposed FY2021 budget justification for HUD included:

  • The Section 202 program is the only federally funded program that expressly addresses the need for affordable elderly housing (and) its impact is amplified through the leverage of other housing.
  • The average annual household income for Section 202 PRAC (accompanying Project Rental Assistance Contract) households is approximately $12,000.
  • HUD is only able to provide assisted housing to one in three seniors who qualify. The demand for such programs is likely to increase as the Baby Boomer generation continues to age into retirement.
  • In addition to demand outpacing investments in elderly housing, there is a growing increase in the number of older Americans with worst-case housing needs. HUD’s Worst-Case Housing Needs: 2017 Report to Congress found that 1.85 million households headed by an elderly person had worst-case housing needs in 2015.
  • The proportion of elderly, very low-income renters with worst-case needs was 39.8 percent in 2015, representing a 2.6 percentage point increase since 2013. Low-income elderly households that rely on fixed incomes may be less likely than households with wage income to benefit from positive economic trends, but elderly households are affected by rising market rents, nonetheless.
  • The Section 202 program helps to reduce the number of vulnerable seniors experiencing worst-case housing needs or homelessness.
  • With the assistance of service coordinators, many of these residents can access community-based services that are designed to help them stay longer in their housing, age in the community, and avoid more expensive institutional settings.

Unfortunately, despite slight increases in the Section 202 elderly housing program, the overall proposed FY2021 budget for the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) would be drastically cut by 15% to $47.9 billion compared to $56.5 billion in FY2020. This harsh cut of $8.6 billion for HUD is much higher than the average 5 to 6 percent proposed cuts for other federal non defense programs (although proposed increase of over $800 million for defense budget).

As stated in EHDOC Board Chairman Chris Shelton’s article, “What is the commitment for Affordable Senior Housing in communities nationwide?” (see Summer, 2019 Housing with a Heart), with recent year funding cuts for the Section 202 program, EHDOC and others have needed to seek alternative funding for the development of affordable senior housing, including HOME, the Affordable Housing Trust Fund, Community Development Block Grants (CDBG) and other funding through state and local governments. Unfortunately, the Administration’s proposed FY2021 budget would eliminate funding for many of these federal programs that have been used to develop affordable housing that assists low-income older persons.

Compounding the proposed funding cuts for affordable housing, the Administration is also seeking harsh cuts to other health and services that assist EHDOC residents and other older persons, including Older Americans Act programs, food stamps (now called Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-SNAP); fuel assistance, caregiver programs, Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security, etc. with indications that additional cuts could be forthcoming (most likely after the election).

Overall, the Administration seeks $4.4 trillion in spending cuts over 10 years, including $2 trillion in non-defense discretionary programs (Congressional annual appropriations, including HUD) and $2 trillion from mandatory programs (Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid). The Administration imposes a cap of $590 billion for non-defense programs despite the bi-partisan budget agreement last year of $626.5 billion for FY2021.

Once again, it is vital that each of us who support affordable senior housing must educate our members of Congress; candidates for elected offices at federal, state, and local offices; as well as other key Administration officials, on the critical need and benefits (to older persons, communities and taxpayers) of the cost-effectiveness of the Section 202 and other affordable housing programs that assist low-income seniors. Our earlier efforts with letter writing, meetings, media, rallies, and other communications have been helpful, but we have a long and tough fight ahead. See EHDOC Board Chairman Christopher Shelton’s article on effective communication needed for affordable senior housing (link).

COVID-19 Is Tougher on Older Men, and Scientists May Now Know Why

Spread the love

By E.J. Mundell
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Sept. 8, 2020 (HealthDay News)
 
News Picture: COVID-19 Is Tougher on Older Men, and Scientists May Now Know Why

Key differences in immune system function may help determine why severe, life-threatening COVID-19 tends to target older men, scientists say.

A new study found that among elderly people and in men, especially, certain factors may lead to a weaker immune system response against infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

That could help explain high rates of intensive care unit admission and death among these patients.

“Host responses to SARS-CoV-2 are dependent on viral load and infection time, with observed differences due to age and sex that may contribute to disease severity,” said a team led by Nicole Lieberman and Alexander Greninger, both of the University of Washington School of Medicine, in Seattle.

In the study, the investigators looked at bits of genetic material (RNA) collected from the nasal swabs of 430 people who tested positive for COVID-19, and another 54 who did not.

The researchers used that material to conduct a deep-dive investigation into the immune system responses of each patient following contact with the new coronavirus.

The findings showed that immune cell responses typically weren’t activated until three days after infection began. Also, the strength and makeup of the immune cell response was dependent on the amount of viral load — and responses also differed by age and sex.

For example, compared to young patients, older patients tended to have “reduced expression” of key immune system agents, which in turn may have triggered “deficiencies” in the activity of T-cells and “natural killer” (NK) cells. Both of those immune system cells are crucial in mounting a good defense against oncoming pathogens.

In addition, men seemed to show reductions in the activity of NK cells and another type of immune system cell, B-cells, compared to what was seen in women, the research team said.

Men infected with SARS-CoV-2 also showed an increase in another immunological pathway that might end in “inappropriately throttling antiviral responses,” the study authors reported.

The report was published online Sept. 8 in PLOS Biology.

Reading over the new findings, infectious disease expert Dr. Amesh Adalja noted that “the clinical course of every infectious disease is a combination of viral factors, such as viral load and host immune response.” Adalja is a senior scholar at the Center for Health Security at Johns Hopkins University, in Baltimore.

“This new study provides more evidence that the reason behind the elderly and males being more susceptible to severe disease from COVID has to do with differences in the host immune response,” he said.

The findings might even point the way to improved treatments, Adalja added.

“By understanding the intricacies of how this dysregulated response occurs, it may become possible to modulate it with precisely targeted therapies, as well as to predict who is more likely to have a severe case,” he said.

Article originally appeared on MedicineNet.com

Too Little Vitamin D Might Raise Odds of Coronavirus Infection

Spread the love

There’s evidence that low blood levels of the “sunshine vitamin” — vitamin D — may increase a person’s risk of infection with the new coronavirus, researchers say.

Vitamin D is important to the function of the immune system and vitamin D supplements have previously been shown to lower the risk of viral respiratory tract infections,” said study lead author Dr. David Meltzer. He’s chief of hospital medicine at the University of Chicago Medicine.

For the new study, Meltzer’s team tracked coronavirus infections among 489 patients whose vitamin D levels were measured within a year before they were tested for the new coronavirus.

While the study couldn’t determine cause and effect, patients with an untreated vitamin D deficiency (blood levels of less than 20 ng/mL) were nearly two times more likely to test positive for the coronavirus than patients with sufficient vitamin D levels, the researchers said.

“Our statistical analysis suggests this may be true for the COVID-19 infection,” Meltzer said in a medical center news release.

Half of Americans are deficient in vitamin D, with much higher rates among Black and Hispanic Americans and people who live in areas like Chicago, where it’s difficult to get enough sun exposure in winter.

The body produces vitamin D when skin is directly exposed to the sun.

“Understanding whether treating vitamin D deficiency changes COVID-19 risk could be of great importance locally, nationally and globally,” Meltzer said. “Vitamin D is inexpensive, generally very safe to take, and can be widely scaled,” he noted.

Further research is needed to determine whether vitamin D supplements might reduce the risk of infection with the new coronavirus and even the severity of COVID-19, the study authors said.

Dr. Len Horovitz is a pulmonologist and internist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. Reading over the new findings, he said that research has “suggested that [vitamin] D plays an essential role in the immune system. This current study underscores this: D appears to reduce the risk of being infected with COVID, and other studies have suggested that patients with D deficiency fare worse with COVID.”

Horovitz suggested that the pandemic might even be raising levels of vitamin D deficiency.

“Because of city living and especially with ‘lockdowns,’ there has been less sun exposure and therefore more finding of D deficiency in my practice,” he noted.

Luckily, an easy remedy is at hand, since vitamin D supplements are available. “The proper dose depends on patient size and their sunlight exposure, and can be easily measured with a simple blood test,” Horovitz said.

Meltzer’s group believes there’s a need for studies to identify strategies for vitamin D supplementation that may be most effective in specific groups of people. The Chicago researchers said they’ve already launched several such clinical trials.

The study was published online Sept. 3 in JAMA Network Open.

— Robert Preidt

This article appeared originally on MedicineNet.com.
MedicalNews

Integra, EHDOC obtain construction financing for Mosaico apartments in Miami Allapattah – South Florida

Spread the love
By   – Senior Reporter, South Florida Business Journal
 

An affordable apartment complex will soon be developed in the Allapattah neighborhood of Miami thanks to a $45.5 million construction loan.

Allapattah Residential, a joint venture between nonprofit Elderly Housing Development Operations Corp. (EHDOC) and Miami-based Integra, obtained the tax-exempt bond through the Housing Finance Authority of Miami-Dade County. It covers the 1.07-acre site at 1362, 1370, 1392, 1396 N.W. 36th St., plus 1373 and 1385 N.W. 35th St.

Mosaico would total 284,805 square feet in 13 stories with 267 apartments. Amenities on the first floor would include a computer room, a community room, an event room, a library, and a fitness room. There would be a laundry room on the second floor. The project would have a community garden as well.

The developer would provide 172 spaces in the parking garage. The parking requirement was reduced because the units will be affordable housing and it’s near the Allapattah Metrorail Station.

Mosaico was designed by C.C. Hodgson Architectural.

There’s recently been a move of development in Allapattah, with both affordable and market-rate apartments. The neighborhood is between the major employment centers of downtown Miami and the Health District.

Article originally appeared in bizjournals.com.

EHDOC Secures $30 Million Construction Loan for Redevelopment of Council Towers Senior Apartment Homes in Miami Beach, FL.

Spread the love
SEPTEMBER 02, 2020
 

Council Towers comprises two, 12-story buildings located on Collins Avenue (at 5th and 10th Streets) in Miami Beach, with a total of 250 one-bedroom units with rental subsidy provided by HUD under a Project-Based Section 8 contract. The substantial rehabilitation of the property, which was originally constructed under HUD’s Section 202 program 40 years ago, will upgrade, preserve and continue to provide quality affordable housing for low-income seniors (below 60% AMI) over age 62.

Sources of funding for this transformative project include the $30 million HUD-insured 221(d)4 loan from Greystone as well as Low-Income Tax Credit Equity, a Sellers’ Note, and Reserve Transfer. The non-recourse HUD-insured loan carries a 40-year term at a fixed, low interest rate.

“Preserving and providing high-quality affordable housing for seniors in Miami Beach is a priority for us, and orchestrating a Section 202 rehabilitation into a stunning community with unparalleled ocean views will deliver a needed respite for our residents,” said Steve Protulis, President and CEO, Elderly Housing Development and Operations Corporation (EHDOC). “We are grateful for all of our partners who made this transaction possible, including Stratford Capital for critical tax credit equity. We hope that the 4% LIHTC program continues to be a viable platform for preserving and creating affordable housing.”

The re-development team will be led by Roland J. Broussard, Vice President of Development for EHDOC, and Jason B. Duguay, Vice President of Stratford Capital Group Development (SCG), along with Larry Hecky, Chief Architect of The Hecky Group and Tom Morrissey, President of T. Morrissey Construction.  The planned timeline for tenant-in-place renovation is projected to take up to 20 months. In addition to exterior façade and common area renovations, individual units will have new kitchens installed with energy-efficient appliances, new bathrooms, decorative lighting, new flooring, new windows and sliders, new roof, complete elevator modernizations, and paint, resulting in a complete refresh for the existing 250  homes.

“Frankly, transformations such as this are hard to come by, but working with a team like Stratford Capital and Greystone having expertise in affordable housing, tax credits, and HUD-insured financing created an opportunity to provide incredible residences for a community that truly deserves it,” added Mr. Broussard.

“Working with sponsors such as EHDOC is such a pleasure because their mission to deliver affordable housing is what drives them,” added Mr. Morales. “This transaction was highly complex, but the end result will be such a treasure to the community, and we are thrilled to have played a part in it. Greystone would also like to congratulate Melanie A. Ribeiro, the Interim President / CEO of EHDOC, who assumes her new role in September 2020. We look forward to working with her and her team on future affordable housing development opportunities”    

About Greystone: Greystone is a private national commercial real estate finance company with an established reputation as a leader in multifamily and healthcare finance, having ranked as a top FHA, Fannie Mae, and Freddie Mac lender in these sectors. Our range of services includes commercial lending across a variety of platforms such as Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, CMBS, FHA, USDA, bridge and proprietary loan products. Loans are offered through Greystone Servicing Company LLC, Greystone Funding Company LLC and/or other Greystone affiliates.

For more information, visit www.greystone.com

This article appeared originally on https://www.multifamilybiz.com

SENIOR LIVING SENIOR DIGNITY SUMMER 2020

Spread the love

by Steve Protulis, EHDOC President and CEO

Harsh Impact of Coronavirus Exposes the Critical Shortage of Safe and Affordable Housing and Services for the Elderly

Steve Protulis, EHDOC President and CEO
Steve Protulis, EHDOC President and CEO

These past few months have been particularly hard with the high rate of infections amongst seniors. Please read the article, “Living Safely in the Age of Coronavirus” (Pg. 9) and stay safe. COVID-19 has also crippled our economy, spiked homelessness, and exposed the critical shortage of safe and affordable housing. While Congress passed in March the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES), its funds are rapidly running out. As our Chairman Christopher Shelton urges in his accompanying article, we need to educate Congress to expand the supply of affordable senior housing. So, what is the Administration proposing in its FY2021 budget to develop affordable senior housing?

When the Administration released its proposed FY2021 budget in early February, I had very mixed feelings. While I was pleasantly surprised that the Administration had requested, for the first time in many years, a slight increase in funding for the construction of Section 202 Supportive Housing for the Elderly, I was also very disappointed and concerned that simultaneously the Administration was proposing very harsh cuts for other affordable housing, health care, and services for the elderly.

This is good news and a step in the right direction since it is the first time since FY2013 that any funds have been requested by the Administration for the Section 202 Capital Advance construction program that EHDOC and other non-profit organizations have long relied upon to develop affordable senior housing. However, despite the increase, it is also woefully inadequate compared to the $825 million that had been funded for Section 202 affordable senior housing in FY2010, including $582 million for new construction.

During recent years when zero funds were neither requested nor funded, the elderly population has significantly increased by several millions (AARP documents that 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 every day); as a result the costs for housing has skyrocketed; and the number of homeless has tragically increased throughout America (over a half million homeless people nightly).

It is difficult to understand and accept these funding cuts when the Administration clearly recognizes the critical shortage of affordable senior housing as documented in their Congressional justification statement that accompanied their FY2021 budget request. Key points cited in the Administration’s proposed FY2021 budget justification for HUD included:

  • The Section 202 program is the only federally funded program that expressly addresses the need for affordable elderly housing (and) its impact is amplified through the leverage of other housing.
  • The average annual household income for Section 202 PRAC (accompanying Project Rental Assistance Contract) households is approximately $12,000.
  • HUD is only able to provide assisted housing to one in three seniors who qualify. The demand for such programs is likely to increase as the Baby Boomer generation continues to age into retirement.
  • In addition to demand outpacing investments in elderly housing, there is a growing increase in the number of older Americans with worst-case housing needs. HUD’s Worst-Case Housing Needs: 2017 Report to Congress found that 1.85 million households headed by an elderly person had worst-case housing needs in 2015.
  • The proportion of elderly, very low-income renters with worst-case needs was 39.8 percent in 2015, representing a 2.6 percentage point increase since 2013. Low-income elderly households that rely on fixed incomes may be less likely than households with wage income to benefit from positive economic trends, but elderly households are affected by rising market rents, nonetheless.
  • The Section 202 program helps to reduce the number of vulnerable seniors experiencing worst-case housing needs or homelessness.
  • With the assistance of service coordinators, many of these residents can access community-based services that are designed to help them stay longer in their housing, age in the community, and avoid more expensive institutional settings.

Unfortunately, despite slight increases in the Section 202 elderly housing program, the overall proposed FY2021 budget for the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) would be drastically cut by 15% to $47.9 billion compared to $56.5 billion in FY2020. This harsh cut of $8.6 billion for HUD is much higher than the average 5 to 6 percent proposed cuts for other federal nondefense programs (although proposed increase of over $800 million for defense budget).

As stated in EHDOC Board Chairman Chris Shelton’s article, “What is the commitment for Affordable Senior Housing in communities nationwide?” (see Summer , 2019 Housing with a Heart), with recent year funding cut s for the Section 202 program, EHDOC and others have needed to seek alternative funding for the development of affordable senior housing , including HOME , the Affordable Housing Trust Fund, Community Development Block Grants (CDBG) and other funding through state and local governments.

Unfortunately, the Administration’s proposed FY2021 budget would eliminate funding for many of these federal programs that have been used to develop affordable housing that assists low-income older persons.

Compounding the proposed funding cuts for affordable housing, the Administration is also seeking harsh cuts to other health and services that assist EHDOC residents and other older persons, including Older Americans Act programs, food stamps (now called Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-SNAP); fuel assistance, caregiver programs, Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security, etc. with indications that additional cuts could be forthcoming (most likely after the election).

Overall, the Administration seeks $4.4 trillion in spending cuts over 10 years, including $2 trillion in non- defense discretionary programs (Congressional annual appropriations, including HUD) and $2 trillion from mandatory programs (Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid). The Administration imposes a cap of $590 billion for non-defense programs despite the bi-partisan budget agreement last year of $626.5 billion for FY2021.

Once again, it is vital that each of us who support affordable senior housing must educate our members of Congress; candidates for elected offices at federal, state, and local offices; as well as other key Administration officials, on the critical need and benefits (to older persons, communities and taxpayers) of the cost-effectiveness of the Section 202 and other affordable housing programs that assist low income seniors. Our earlier efforts with letter writing, meetings, media, rallies, and other communications have been helpful, but we have a long and tough fight ahead. See EHDOC Board Chairman Christopher Shelton’s accompanying article on effective communication needed for affordable senior housing.

 

 

 

From our Chairman of the Board: Summer 2020

Spread the love

These Difficult Times Require Effective Communication to Support Safe and Affordable Senior Housing

by Christopher M. Shelton, EHDOC Board Chairman

 

Chris M. Shelton - EHDOC Chairman
Chris M. Shelton – EHDOC Chairman

While some older persons are very fortunate to live in safe and affordable senior housing, it has been revealed during these difficult times with coronavirus that a high unemployment rate and homelessness has had a dire impact on the elderly and their families, causing more of a critical shortage of affordable senior housing. It is vital that we effectively communicate with our elected officials and candidates to educate them on the cost-effective health and housing benefits of senior housing; and the critical need to promptly expand the supply, particularly more funding for the Section 202 elderly housing program.

What is effective communication and how do we achieve it? Some of you may recall that last year the Administration had also proposed to cut federal funding for affordable housing, including zero funds for construction under the Section 202 program. Yet, through active participation with others, EHDOC residents, their families, our Board members, partners and others took a number of decisive actions, including letter writing, meetings, social networking, and rallies, that resulted in Congress funding these vital programs, including $90 million for Section 202 construction of affordable senior housing.

As EHDOC Chair and as President of the Communication Workers of America (CWA), I have a keen interest in how EHDOC effectively communicates our mission and public policy priorities to assist our senior residents and others seeking affordable senior housing and services.

While there are some variations, many of us are familiar with the basic “5 W’s” of effective communication and journalism: who, what, where, why and when; as well as the often accompanying how. In Politics, these 5 W’s were modified and popularized by Harold Lasswell’s book: “Politics: Who Gets What, When, How.” Therefore, how do we apply these basic aspects of effective communication for the Administration’s proposed FY2021 federal budget for affordable senior housing?

What’s our message? What do we want: to increase federal funding for affordable senior housing, particularly Section 202 Supportive Elderly Housing construction funds. While we are pleased that the Administration is seeking $100 million for Section 202 construction funds, this vital program should be funded at a minimum of $600 million, as it was a decade ago ($582 million in FY2010) and preceding years.

Why do we want this increased funding? Steve’s article in this issue (and preceding issues) of Housing with a Heart provides background on the critical need for increased funding including: critical shortage of affordable housing, multi-year waiting lists for EHDOC residences; increased homelessness and vulnerability to become homeless; as well as taxpayers benefits with this cost-effective program’s impact on health and long-term care costs.

Who do we want to communicate/educate on the need to increase funding? We want to educate our current Congressional members especially where EHDOC has facilities (their constituents), particularly a member of Congressional leadership, including key committees or subcommittees, such as Housing Appropriations (Transportation and Housing and Urban Development). In addition, we want to communicate/educate candidates seeking national (White House, Congress), state (Governor, state legislators), and local offices (Mayors and city council).

When do we want to communicate our concerns to increase the supply of affordable senior housing? ASAP. The proposed budget was introduced in early February. The key Congressional commit tees have already begun hearings and other actions to gather background information prior to voting this Spring. The fiscal year (FY) 2021 budget is supposed to begin October 1st, 2020. It is anticipated that Congressional action will be accelerated this year because of the elections.

Where is the most effective place to communicate with our elected officials (and candidates)? Every opportunity that you have to be with an elected official or candidates, as well as their key staff members who are responsible for affordable housing, services and health care for the elderly. While their national office is an important place to meet with Congressional members (and key staff), it may be easier to meet at their district or state office. However, the most effective place to communicate with elected officials or candidates is to invite them to EHDOC communities so they can learn first-hand about our residents (their constituents) and how an investment of federal funds (including the Section 202 program) benefits older persons, the state and local community, and taxpayers.

How is the remaining question. EHDOC, our residents, and others have many options and can use their best judgement on how to effectively communicate these “who, what, where, when and how” actions. As cited earlier, residents and others supporting affordable senior housing can write letters (text, emails and other written communications), make calls, meet with elected and key public officials, candidates, and their staff; attend or conduct rallies and public forums; write articles, conduct interviews, testify, make videos as well as the use of other media to increase public awareness; run for office, volunteer and contribute to candidates and so forth.

Each of you reading this article can be an effective advocate for EHDOC’s mission and with collective actions to increase federal funding (particularly the Section 202 Supportive Housing for the Elderly program). In closing, I’d like to reference two motivational speakers regarding effective communications: Jim Rohn – “Effective communication is 20% what you know and 80% how you feel about what you know.” and Zig Ziglar – “You never know when a moment and a few sincere words can have an impact on a life”….particularly a vulnerable older person seeking affordable housing with services.

Online Safety Tips For Seniors

Spread the love

More and more seniors have grown comfortable being online and having a presence on social media. This is a great way for them to stay connected to friends and family and aware of what’s going on in the world. If they do not know how to safely navigate online, this could lead to several avoidable mishaps. Here are a few online safety tips for older adults.

Use a Password Generator

Depending on the browser, there could be a free password generator available that creates a unique, strong password. Even better is that the software memorizes the password, giving older users one less thing to worry about. This tip is great for anyone and everyone who’s online, not just the elderly. This is because so many people use the same password for all their online accounts. This creates a vulnerability if hackers should get hold of a single password. They then gain access to several different accounts.

Maintain Antivirus Software

Keeping up-to-date on the latest online threats can be rather exhausting. That’s where antivirus software comes in handy. They should have a reliable antivirus program installed on their computer. They then don’t have to worry as much about unknown vulnerabilities hackers can take advantage of. Such software should be downloaded on a tablet, computer and smartphone, just to ensure all bases are covered. Also, senior citizens should be sure the software is set up so it periodically searches for updates. These are then downloaded as they become available.

Learn How To Google

For their health, seniors should turn to a medical expert like Dr. Rohit Varma for questions about glaucoma and cataracts, since these are common in the elderly community. In a similar way, senior citizens need to get into the habit of googling websites and email solicitations they aren’t familiar with. Specifically, it’s best to type in the website or solicitation in the browser followed by “+ scam.” That way, Google will search for connections related to whether the email or site is malicious.

Use Two-Step Authentication When the Option Presents Itself

There’s no such thing as going too far when it comes to online security. Hackers have become more sophisticated than ever. This makes it paramount that users take every precaution to lock down their information and keep themselves safe. Two-step authentication adds an extra layer of protection to passwords. This makes it that much harder for online criminals to access them. The main goal of this level of authentication is so websites, apps, and other services know the right person is accessing an account and all the information in it. Two-step authentication adds another layer of peace of mind for seniors and their loved ones.

Second Guess Urgent Emails

Scammers rely on fear to get their victims to click on malware links and give up sensitive information. Any emails seniors receive that require immediate action or have a lot of exclamation points require scrutiny. This is where a bit of googling and calling the company personally can get to the bottom of what’s going on. Usually, it’s best to reach out to companies that send emails like this first rather than take a call from them at face value.

Senior citizens should do what they can to keep from becoming online victims. These tips, and a bit of vigilance go a long way.

This article appeared originally at: seniorhealthmemos.com